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The weather in Kansas may be unseasonably warm for the next several days, but we’re entering the time of year when a winter storm can blow in suddenly.

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At first glance, soil sampling would seem to be a relatively easy task. However, when you consider the variability that likely exists within a field because of inherent soil formation factors and past production practices, the collection of a representative soil sample becomes more of a challenge.

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Black walnuts are ready to be harvested when the hull can be dented with your thumb. You can also wait until the nuts start falling from the tree. Either way it is important to hull walnuts soon after harvest. If not removed, the hull will leach a stain through the nut and into the meat. The…

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Fall is the season when most horse owners should think of how they can improve their horse pastures for the coming year. Some pastures might have been managed well and others not, depending on their management efforts. Horse pasture improvement and renovation requires some time and patience.…

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September is the best month to reseed cool-season lawns such as tall fescue and Kentucky bluegrass. However, you can get by with an early to mid-October planting for tall fescue. October 15 is generally considered the last day for safely planting or overseeding a tall fescue lawn in the fall…

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Brown County youth will have 4-H projects on display at the Kansas State Fair in the 4-H building and the livestock barns. If you are considering attending the fair or want to learn more about the Kansas State Fair the following is a press release from the fair about everything it has to off…

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September is here and that means it is prime time to fertilize your tall fescue or Kentucky bluegrass lawns. If you could only fertilize your cool-season grasses once per year, this would be the best time to do it.

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The extremely hot weather we have had recently not only interferes with flower pollination but also can affect how quickly fruit matures. The best temperature for tomato growth and fruit development is 85 to 90F. When temperatures exceed 100 degrees, the plant goes into survival mode and con…

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Telling when a melon is ready to be harvested can be a challenge, or it may be quite easy. It all depends on the type of melon. Let’s start with the easy one. Muskmelons are one of those crops that tell you when they are ready to be picked. This can help you not only harvest melons at the co…

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Tomatoes often have problems with cracking caused by pressure inside the fruit that is more than the skin can handle. Cracks are usually on the upper part of the fruit and can be concentric (in concentric circles around the stem) or radial (radiating from the stem). We don’t know everything …

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Be sure to check out the Brown County Free Fair in Horton, KS on July 8-13. A schedule of events can be found on our website: http://www.brown.k-state.edu/ along with this year’s Fairbook. Speaking of Fairbook’s be sure to check out the open class section to see what you can enter in the fai…

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Next year’s strawberry crop will be affected by what you do to this year’s strawberry bed. The sooner after harvest the patch is cleaned up, fertilized and irrigated, if possible, the better the chance of getting a good crop next year. One of the main goals in renovation is to provide a high…

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Bagworms, Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis, are emerging from eggs, and the young caterpillars are out and- about feeding on plants. Eventually bagworms will be present throughout the rest of Kansas feeding on both broadleaf and evergreen trees and shrubs. Therefore, now is the time to initiate…

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This time of year, two common leaf-spot diseases appear on tomato plants. Septoria leaf spot and early blight are both characterized by brown spots on the leaves.

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K-State and Research-Brown County and 4-H is starting the summer off right! We have a number of fun Day Camps to offer the public and to 4-Hers getting ready for the fair. The first one begins on June 4 and continues on every Tuesday of June and July at the Horton Library during their Summer…

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Soils are warm enough now that tomatoes can benefit from mulching. Tomatoes prefer even levels of soil moisture and mulches provide such by preventing excessive evaporation. Other benefits of mulching include weed suppression, moderating soil temperatures and preventing the formation of a ha…

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Year of Planting: Apply one-half cup of a 10-10-10 fertilizer per vine as growth begins in the spring. Repeat after one month. Fertilizers should be spread evenly from the trunk out 3 to 5 feet.

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Fresh pickles, ripe tomatoes and other garden goodies may still be months away, but if you plan on canning those foods, now’s a good time to check on your supplies.

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Spring-bearing strawberry plants that were set out this spring should have blossoms pinched off. New plants have a limited amount of energy. If blossoms remain on the plants, energy that should go to runner development is used to mature fruit instead. Plants that are allowed to fruit will ev…

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Archery Folk! The time has come! Get out your bows, arrows, and targets, dust them off and let’s shoot!!

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Got dead pine trees? If you are in the eastern half of Kansas, they probably died of pine wilt, a disease that is widespread in that part of the state. If you are in central or western Kansas, pine wilt is less common but it can still occur in pockets.

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Mark Noll graduated from Kansas State University with a master’s in swine management. After graduation, he joined his father on their livestock and crop operation. Mark is a 35-year member of St. Ann’s Knights of Columbus Council. He volunteered his time to travel with 4-Hers to state geolog…

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It’s mid-winter and we are now looking forward to moving cattle to new grass! New grass means an opportunity to stop feeding hay and getting the cattle out of the muddy conditions. New grass season is also the time to “Clean-Up” the manure and waste hay around the winter feeding site(s).

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What is one of the best things you can do for your body, mind and spirit? You guessed it — move your way, every day! K-State Research and Extension (KSRE) is pleased to offer this health initiative designed to help you move more, eat better and live life to the fullest. Regular exercise can …

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Successful forage production and establishment begins with purchasing high quality seed. Quality of forage seed sold in the market varies, so it is important to understand how to evaluate and purchase good quality seed to ensure successful production from the start.

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On Feb. 13, at the NE Kansas Heritage (Jackson County Fair Grounds), 12200 214th Road in Holton, we hope to give you an idea of what your possibilities are for passing down the farm to the next generation or to keep your operation going. This meeting will start at 1:30 pm. It is being co-spo…

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If you are considering purchasing fruit trees this spring, there are certain factors that should be considered for some of our fruit tree species. Spring in Kansas is often unsettled with apricot and peach tree flowers being very vulnerable to late frosts that can kill fruit buds. Of course,…

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This year’s Spotlight Auction is scheduled for March 11 to 12 on KNZA radio. This is Brown County Free Fairs annual fundraiser where all the funds raised are used to fund the 2019 fair. Currently we are out soliciting donations from businesses and Individuals for this year’s auction.

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Kansas is fortunate to have the scenic county side, a relatively low cost of living, and produces a valuable part of our food supply.

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A series of nine K-State Soybean Production Schools will be offered in late January to provide in-depth training targeted for soybean producers and key-stakeholders. The schools will be sponsored by the Kansas Soybean Commission.

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For many families, it’s a pretty special time when the holiday ham is sliced, veggies are cooked and the rolls are golden brown. Kansas State University agricultural economist Andrew Barkley notes that consumers may not realize there’s probably a healthy helping of science on the holiday pla…

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Ever thought about judging a project at the County Fair or wondered what it took to become a judge? From 5:30 to 8 p.m. on Dec. 27, at the Oskaloosa Public Schools USD 341, Oskaloosa, Northeast Kansas Extension Agents are hosting judges training to recruit judges for future fairs.

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MANHATTAN, Kan. — The weather in Kansas may be unseasonably warm for the next several days, but we’re entering the time of year when a winter storm can blow in suddenly.

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Whether you’re a novice at cooking, or are the experienced short-order cook at your house, chances are that you don’t prepare a 14-pound holiday turkey and all the trimmings every day. Kansas State University’s Karen Blakeslee says there are ways to avoid last-minute stress and keep food saf…

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The thrill of the hunt can continue at the dinner table if the game isn’t handled properly along the way. Game meats are excellent sources of protein and similar in composition to domestic animal meats. Calorie and fat contents vary with the age and species of the animal.

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Black walnuts are ready to be harvested when the hull can be dented with your thumb. You can also wait until the nuts start falling from the tree. Either way it is important to hull walnuts soon after harvest. If not removed, the hull will leach a stain through the nut and into the meat. The…

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Though light pruning and removal of dead wood are fine this time of year, more severe pruning should be left until spring. Consider pruning to be “light” if 10 percent of less of the plant is removed. Dead wood does not count in this calculation. Keep in mind that even light pruning of sprin…

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Brown County 4-H Shooting Sports would like to thank the following organizations for their support of our shooting sports program:

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Fall is the season when most horse owners should think of how they can improve their horse pastures for the coming year. Some pastures might have been managed well and others not, depending on their management efforts. Horse pasture improvement and renovation requires some time and patience.…

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Fresh tomatoes, peppers and onions equal…what else? Salsa, of course!

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September is the best month to reseed cool-season lawns such as tall fescue and Kentucky bluegrass. However, you can get by with an early to mid-October planting for tall fescue. Oct. 15 is generally considered the last day for safely planting or overseeding a tall fescue lawn in the fall. I…

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Brown County youth will have 4-H projects on display at the Kansas State Fair in the 4-H building and the livestock barns. If you are considering attending the fair or want to learn more about the Kansas State Fair the following is a press release from the fair about everything it has to off…

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September is here and that means it is prime time to fertilize your tall fescue or Kentucky bluegrass lawns. If you could only fertilize your cool-season grasses once per year, this would be the best time to do it.